Robert Parkins

Professor of the Practice in the Department of Music

Organ and Harpsichord

Office: 
66 Mary Duke Biddle, Durham, NC 27708
Campus Box: 
90665
Phone: 
(919) 660-3315
Office Hours: 
Friday 4-6 PM

Robert Parkins is the University Organist and a Professor of the Practice of Music at Duke University. He first assumed the position of Chapel Organist at Duke in 1975, then joined the faculty of the School of Music at Ithaca College in 1982, returning to Duke in 1985.

 

A graduate of the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and the Yale University School of Music, Dr. Parkins studied organ with Gerre Hancock, Charles Krigbaum, and Michael Schneider, as well as harpsichord with Ralph Kirkpatrick. As a Fulbright scholar he pursued further organ study in Vienna with Anton Heiller. 

 

Dr. Parkins has concertized throughout the United States and Europe as well as in Central America. His organ and harpsichord recordings have appeared on the Calcante, Gothic, Musical Heritage Society, and Naxos labels. Still available are several CD’s recorded on the Flentrop, Aeolian, and Brombaugh organs in Duke Chapel, including Early Iberian Organ Music, Brahms: Complete Organ Works, German Romantic Organ Music, Iberian and South German Organ Music, and Organ Music of Frescobaldi.

Education

  • D.M.A. 1980, Yale University
  • MMA 1975, Yale University
  • Fulbright Scholar 1974, Hochschule für Musik, Vienna
  • MM 1973, Yale University
  • BM 1970, University of Cincinnati

Faculty Organ Recital ("Magnificat"), Duke Chapel, 3/23/14. Musician. (2014)

Abstract

Program title: "Magnificat." Organ works based on the Magnificat, including music by early Iberian and French composers, plus works of Bach and Rheinberger on the Brombaugh and Flentrop organs. Assisted by Kristen Blackman, cantor, and members of the Duke Vespers Ensemble, directed by Brian Schmidt.

Harpsichord Recital, HKSNA Conference, Vermillion, SD, 5/17/14. Musician. (2014)

Abstract

Program title: "Late Renaissance Keyboard Music from Iberia." Performed on the anonymous Neapolitan harpsichord (ca. 1530) in the National Music Museum for the annual conference of the Historical Keyboard Society of North America.

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